Advertisement
Advertisement
Our Partners:
Home      Advertising     Careers    Cities   Resources    Contact
Please begin your apartment search, which will only take two minutes of your time, to receive the lowest rates and the best property information  in your area.  With submitting your information to several properties, this will just open the doors to more opportunities to find that perfect property.  Doesn't cost anything to request information, so good luck with your search!
Apartment Search............ Click Here!
Powered by eeNation.com
Apartment Tools
Expensive Apartment Rentals
eeApartments.com  >  Tools  >  Renters Insurance
Apartment  insurance, also commonly called hazard insurance or homeowners insurance (often abbreviated in the real estate industry as HOI), is the type of property insurance that covers private homes. It is an insurance policy that combines various personal insurance protections, which can include losses occurring to one's home, its contents, loss of its use (additional living expenses), or loss of other personal possessions of the homeowner, as well as liability insurance for accidents that may happen at the home.

The cost of homeowners insurance often depends on what it would cost to replace the house and which additional riders—additional items to be insured—are attached to the policy. The insurance policy itself is a lengthy contract, and names what will and what will not be paid in the case of various events. Typically, claims due to earthquakes, floods, "Acts of God", or war (whose definition typically includes a nuclear explosion from any source) are excluded. Special insurance can be purchased for these possibilities, including flood insurance and earthquake insurance. Insurance must be updated to the present and existing value at whatever inflation up or down, and an appraisal paid by the insurance company will be added on to the policy premium.

The apartment insurance policy is usually a term contract—a contract that is in effect for a fixed period of time. The payment the insured makes to the insurer is called the premium. The insured must pay the insurer the premium each term. Most insurers charge a lower premium if it appears less likely the home will be damaged or destroyed: for example, if the house is situated next to a fire station, or if the house is equipped with fire sprinklers and fire alarms.
Save up to 20% on Renters Insurance > Click Here!